mt
missingmarilyn:


It was Friday afternoon, August 3, 1962, around five thirty in New York, when I received a phone call from Marilyn. What a pleasant surprise! She asked me about the magazine story and our book project. I told her both were going well.
"There’s so much more I want to tell you for the book. When are you coming back?" she asked.
I told her that we had enough for the book—I just needed to ask her a few more questions about this and that, to fill in certain areas that we hadn’t really talked about.
She cut in to tell me excitedly that Jack Benny, on whose show she’d made her first television appearance, wanted her to put together a Las Vegas show with him. Frank Sinatra and Marlon Brando (she’d always wanted to work with him) had called with film offers, and a top producer had offered her a starring role in a Broadway play (something else she’d always dreamed of). Fox wanted her to begin shooting a film with Dean Martin in September.
She told me she was reading two wonderful books: Captain Newman and To Kill A Mockingbird.
"You’ve just got to get back here," she said. Her voice sounded like she had just hit the jackpot. She never seemed happier.
I told her I’d try to leave by Monday or the middle of the week at the latest, and that I was very happy for her. I asked about her plans for the weekend, and she said she’d probably just relax, go out to dinner, and then maybe go over to the Lawfords for their regular Saturday night party. Then she said, “Love you—see you Monday or when you get out here.”
I said I loved her, too.
Fewer than twenty-four hours after Marilyn’s phone call, she was dead. The press told the world she had committed suicide. I will never believe Marilyn took her own life. She had too much to live for. She was excited about this book. She sounded so happy…It remains my belief, though I have no proof, that she was murdered.

- George Barris, Marilyn: Her Life In Her Own Words

missingmarilyn:

It was Friday afternoon, August 3, 1962, around five thirty in New York, when I received a phone call from Marilyn. What a pleasant surprise! She asked me about the magazine story and our book project. I told her both were going well.

"There’s so much more I want to tell you for the book. When are you coming back?" she asked.

I told her that we had enough for the book—I just needed to ask her a few more questions about this and that, to fill in certain areas that we hadn’t really talked about.

She cut in to tell me excitedly that Jack Benny, on whose show she’d made her first television appearance, wanted her to put together a Las Vegas show with him. Frank Sinatra and Marlon Brando (she’d always wanted to work with him) had called with film offers, and a top producer had offered her a starring role in a Broadway play (something else she’d always dreamed of). Fox wanted her to begin shooting a film with Dean Martin in September.

She told me she was reading two wonderful books: Captain Newman and To Kill A Mockingbird.

"You’ve just got to get back here," she said. Her voice sounded like she had just hit the jackpot. She never seemed happier.

I told her I’d try to leave by Monday or the middle of the week at the latest, and that I was very happy for her. I asked about her plans for the weekend, and she said she’d probably just relax, go out to dinner, and then maybe go over to the Lawfords for their regular Saturday night party. Then she said, “Love you—see you Monday or when you get out here.”

I said I loved her, too.

Fewer than twenty-four hours after Marilyn’s phone call, she was dead. The press told the world she had committed suicide. I will never believe Marilyn took her own life. She had too much to live for. She was excited about this book. She sounded so happy…It remains my belief, though I have no proof, that she was murdered.

- George Barris, Marilyn: Her Life In Her Own Words

the-stars-descend:

the-stars-descend:

You’re living, you occupy space, and you have mass.

You know what that means?

You matter

Calling cards of Parisian Prostitutes

1925-35

❝ 1. If you like someone, wait.
2. Give lots of compliments, even if you’re shy. Everyone else is too.
3. Change. Get a haircut, try new perfume, get new sheets. Become better than you were before.
4. Eat healthier. Learn to cook something fancy.
5. Get up earlier and watch the sun come up.
6. Wear soft clothes, take a bath, drink something warm.
7. Meet someone new, even just a friend.
8. Become closer with your friends and your family. Call your mother. Cry with your best friend. Tell everyone how much you appreciate them.
9. Keep your room clean. Buy some candles. Let the natural light in.
10. Make a list of reasons why you’ll be better off without them. Believe they are true, because they are.
11. Listen to new music.
12. Write everything you’re thinking and feeling. Write letters. Write happy letters, sad letters, and angry letters, even if you’re never going to send them.
13. It’s okay to be sad, but not forever. Sadness is not as beautiful as music makes it seem. Lack of sleep makes your eyes droopy, not deep. Wake up every morning and tell yourself you’re going to have a good day.
14. Go to the library. Don’t forget to look in the music section.
15. Remove them from your life. Get rid of the things they gave you if they make you sad. They’re not worth it. You will never be happy if you continue to hold on to the things that make you sad.
16. Make new memories.
17. Try to find something to appreciate in everything you do or experience.
18. Being alone is okay, you don’t have to surround yourself with people.
19. Become your own best friend. Buy yourself coffee and drink it alone in a cafe. Take your time.
20. Learn to love every bit of yourself. ❞

— (via weed-kitchen)


A Dog’s Birthday, 1960s

A Dog’s Birthday, 1960s

moridash:

britishstarr:

kkristoff:

cold-never-bothered-me-anyways:

Arabian Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

GIVE ME THESE I M M E D I A T E L Y

I AM SO TEMPTED TO DRAW THIS YOU HAVE NO IDEA

DRAW THIS

Twin Peaks Theme (Instrumental)
Artist: Angelo Badalamenti
Album: Music From Twin Peaks
Played: 22069 times
posted 1 day ago with 3,714 notes
via pfoe source: nickdrake

Visual Development from 101 Dalmations

rexuality:

I need to have as much wild sex as possible so one day I can become an inappropriate old lady that blurts out things like “when I was your age I got a concussion after being bent over a desk” and then my family can be like “grandma please, you’re making easter dinner really uncomfortable” and it’ll be great